1. I have to say I have an incredible musical education because of my father.
    Kareem Abdul-Jabba (via kushandwizdom)

    Good Vibes HERE

    (via these-teen-quotes)
    Reblogged from: thegoodmeme
  2. A steak with lobsters and some broccoli

    A steak with lobsters and some broccoli

    Reblogged from: teenagerposts
  3. montereybayaquarium:

    Living the Dream: Cancer Survivor to Teen Conservation Leader

    By Tessa Terrill, Public Relations Intern

    How often in life do things come full circle?

    Seamus Morrison experienced a full-circle moment this summer at the Monterey Bay Aquarium.

    He first came to the Aquarium in 2010 through the Make-A-Wish Foundation as an 11-year old with a life-threatening brain cancer – and a dream of becoming a marine biologist.  He went behind the scenes to feed the cuttlefishes, spent a morning talking to scientists with our partners at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), and an afternoon with dolphins and seals at Long Marine Lab in Santa Cruz. He even took two scuba dives in our Great Tide Pool.

    “It was really fun at the time, and I loved the experience,” he says.” But now it’s just so much more. I look back on it and I just think it was one of the best experiences of my life.” 

    Cancer-free and riding the wave

    Four years later, cancer-free and still riding the marine biology wave, he and his parents, James and Riad Morrison, packed their bags and made the trip from Ojai in southern California to spend the summer in Monterey so Seamus could follow his dream – as a Teen Conservation Leader (TCL) at the Aquarium.

    George Matsumoto, Senior Research and Education Specialist at MBARI and his MBARI guide four years ago, is overjoyed that Seamus came back as a teen leader, and said Seamus told him how much he was growing through his participation in the program. 

    When he was 10, Seamus was diagnosed with a rare brain tumor called medulloblastoma. That didn’t dim his passion for diving headfirst into marine biology, a passion that was present since he was very young.

    Ocean-ified Halloween

    Seamus’s dad James, who has a successful career as an actor with roles in shows like “24” and “Revenge”, said that Seamus’s Halloween costumes have always been ocean-ified. 

    One year, he was a scuba diver and even had a tank made of a cereal box that he would open with the pull of a cord to collect trick-or-treat candy!

    For six weeks this summer, now 15-year-old Seamus took his passion and spread it among Aquarium guests as he shared stories about the range of sea life exhibited throughout the aquarium – including as a narrator for Kelp Forest feeding shows. 

    When Seamus was getting ready to narrate the feeding one day, he was surprised to learn that the diver was the one who took him into the Great Tide Pool through Underwater Explorers four years ago. 

    'An amazing journey'

    “That (Make-A-Wish) experience and his continued relationship with the Aquarium have further inspired him toward the dream of one day becoming a real marine biologist,” says his mother, Riad. “It’s been and continues to be an amazing journey.” 

    Seamus said he loves the Monterey Bay Aquarium because there’s “more stuff” here than at any other aquarium he’s visited.

    He’s already taking action to build on his summer experience and help inspire ocean conservation. He’s emailed his teachers about a plan to create a conservation lab when he returns to school. He said his teachers are on board and he’ll talk to them this fall about how to make it a reality.

    Learn more about our conservation leadership programs for teens

    Help make our teen programs possible with your donation

    (Photos by Randy Tunnell)

    Reblogged from: montereybayaquarium
  4. Whosoever is delighted in solitude, is either a wild beast or a god.
    Reblogged from: thegoodmeme
  5. No great mind has ever existed without a touch of madness.
    Reblogged from: thegoodmeme
  6. A dreamer is one who can only find his way by moonlight, and his punishment is that he sees the dawn before the rest of the world.
    Reblogged from: thegoodmeme
  7. scienceisbeauty:

A stunning picture has won the National Geographic Traveler contest this year. Supercell over the plains of eastern Colorado.
Location: Julesburg, Colorado, USA
Credit: Marko Korošec
Source: First Place Winner: The Independence Day (NG)

    scienceisbeauty:

    A stunning picture has won the National Geographic Traveler contest this year. Supercell over the plains of eastern Colorado.

    Location: Julesburg, Colorado, USA

    Credit: Marko Korošec

    Source: First Place Winner: The Independence Day (NG)

    Reblogged from: scienceisbeauty
  8. Unity can only be manifested by the Binary. Unity itself and the idea of Unity are already two.
    Reblogged from: thegoodmeme
  9. science-junkie:

Why It’s So Hard to Catch Your Own Typos
[…] Typos suck. They are saboteurs, undermining your intent, causing your resume to land in the “pass” pile, or providing sustenance for an army of pedantic critics. Frustratingly, they are usually words you know how to spell, but somehow skimmed over in your rounds of editing. If we are our own harshest critics, why do we miss those annoying little details?
The reason typos get through isn’t because we’re stupid or careless, it’s because what we’re doing is actually very smart, explains psychologist Tom Stafford, who studies typos of the University of Sheffield in the UK. “When you’re writing, you’re trying to convey meaning. It’s a very high level task,” he said.
As with all high level tasks, your brain generalizes simple, component parts (like turning letters into words and words into sentences) so it can focus on more complex tasks (like combining sentences into complex ideas). “We don’t catch every detail, we’re not like computers or NSA databases,” said Stafford. “Rather, we take in sensory information and combine it with what we expect, and we extract meaning.”
When we’re reading other peoples’ work, this helps us arrive at meaning faster by using less brain power. When we’re proof reading our own work, we know the meaning we want to convey. Because we expect that meaning to be there, it’s easier for us to miss when parts (or all) of it are absent. The reason we don’t see our own typos is because what we see on the screen is competing with the version that exists in our heads.
Read more @WIRED

    science-junkie:

    Why It’s So Hard to Catch Your Own Typos

    […] Typos suck. They are saboteurs, undermining your intent, causing your resume to land in the “pass” pile, or providing sustenance for an army of pedantic critics. Frustratingly, they are usually words you know how to spell, but somehow skimmed over in your rounds of editing. If we are our own harshest critics, why do we miss those annoying little details?

    The reason typos get through isn’t because we’re stupid or careless, it’s because what we’re doing is actually very smart, explains psychologist Tom Stafford, who studies typos of the University of Sheffield in the UK. “When you’re writing, you’re trying to convey meaning. It’s a very high level task,” he said.

    As with all high level tasks, your brain generalizes simple, component parts (like turning letters into words and words into sentences) so it can focus on more complex tasks (like combining sentences into complex ideas). “We don’t catch every detail, we’re not like computers or NSA databases,” said Stafford. “Rather, we take in sensory information and combine it with what we expect, and we extract meaning.”

    When we’re reading other peoples’ work, this helps us arrive at meaning faster by using less brain power. When we’re proof reading our own work, we know the meaning we want to convey. Because we expect that meaning to be there, it’s easier for us to miss when parts (or all) of it are absent. The reason we don’t see our own typos is because what we see on the screen is competing with the version that exists in our heads.

    Read more @WIRED

    Reblogged from: science-junkie
  10. fallontonight:

    Ron Funches speaks the truth! 

    anytime?

    Reblogged from: fallontonight
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